Memory Board: A Novel


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To ask other readers questions about Memory Board , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Aug 01, Erika Nerdypants rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is possibly one of the loveliest books I have read. There are so many layers in the story of David and Diana, estranged twins who are recently reunited, and I realized that had I read this book 20 years ago, it might not have spoken to me the way it did now. There is the love story between Constance and Diana, who have been together for forty years, and who now have to cope with Constance's memory loss and slow slide into dementia.

David has his own struggles as he is trying to strike a bal This is possibly one of the loveliest books I have read. David has his own struggles as he is trying to strike a balance between letting go of his adult children without losing a sense of belonging and family. The writing is lyrical, the descriptions of gardens and the desert evocative, but for me the real prize here is in how deftly and sensitively Rule handled her characters.

Sep 17, Jo-anne rated it really liked it. Absolutely loved this book. Read it by accident as I had loaned to someone over 20 years ago and they returned it while doing a bookshelf cleaning! Turned out I had never read it, although I have a great many of Jane Rules books. What a marvellous writer. Being set in Vancouver in the mid 's it was a bit of a walk down memory lane.

Rule's writing is so easy to read and her characters are fully fleshed unlike the Urquhart I just read: An interesting look as well at the gay community in t Absolutely loved this book. An interesting look as well at the gay community in the 80's and the attitude towards AIDS HIV which was just becoming a huge health issue.

I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to have a different perspective on what families can mean to each other and how they can both be a bane and a salvation. Mar 18, Barrett rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: I read this book several years ago and it haunts me still. A wonderful cautionary tale.

  1. Memory Board: A Novel - Jane Rule - Google Книги!
  2. The Night of Knives.
  3. Presence: Collected Stories.

Engaging family jourey I was caught up in this journey between a brother and sister. Having gone through a similar situation it was a inspiration to embrace family, they are really the only true friends. Of the early struggles of glbtaq persons. A powerful love story, involving many people.

Memory Board

A reminder of how deep family ties can be. Dec 31, Jocelyn rated it liked it Shelves: Jan 03, Sharon rated it liked it. Jane Rule was ahead of the curve when she published this story about sharing life with a person with memory loss. Instead, Memory Board is gentle and loving, so much so that I wondered if Rule succumbed to fantasy, but just as aging brings out different aspects of people, so too, must dementia.

Rule takes the reader into a warm home in which the long-term couple le Jane Rule was ahead of the curve when she published this story about sharing life with a person with memory loss. Rule takes the reader into a warm home in which the long-term couple lead cozy lives and the blank moments are taken in stride with resourcefulness and good humor. Constance, the one who needs the memory board to manage her day, recognizes Diana and is for the time being spared the fear of having no idea who shares her bed. Both women are blessed with good sense and confident dispositions, comfortable with the relationship they have tended, at ease with the once jagged edges now smoothed by loving regard.

History, Memory, and the Novel

They each possess an independent sense of self that has accommodated commitment with minimum compromise. Their golden pond is peaceful, even the presence of another romantic partner in the form of Jill, does not rock their boat. Rule has never lacked courage as a writer and she uses it here to explore David, from the inside out, amid trust issues stirred by his desire to reconnect.

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Memory Board reflects the homophobia of the late 's. I liked how they helped the person with memory loss by saying, "Let me remember that for you". A major literary figure in Canada, she wrote seven novels as well as short stories and nonfiction. Lesbrary Link Round Up: The plot centers around David and Diana's reconciliation and the weaving together of their lives and extended family in their senior years. I followed the advice of the professors who gave me a quick Jane Rule via facebook thanks Wendy and Douglass! See all 8 reviews.

The novel concerns marriage same-sex and heterosexual , prejudice, trust, change, reliability, family and love. It focuses on what is broken and what can be repaired. Memory Board reflects the homophobia of the late 's. Spending time with Rule's Diana is like being invited to enjoy intelligent conversation in a flawed world that has, above all, decency and order. Sep 04, Nina rated it liked it. This is a Kitchen Sink book as in, toss in everything but the kitchen sink.

The central plot line is too slender to support a novel: So Rule tosses in complications: Diana, the doctor lesbian twin, is o This is a Kitchen Sink book as in, toss in everything but the kitchen sink. Diana, the doctor lesbian twin, is oh-so-accepting of the AIDS boy, although she has no contact with the gay community in general, and no background in AIDS, and has shown a rather rigid approach to pretty much everything else.

One gets the feeling that since the book is set in the '80s, Rule felt she had to include what we used to call the Plague. Yet her distant and dispassionate descriptions of the dying boy indicates she probably didn't have any direct experience here. Those of us who survived the '80s in NYC, watching our friends die, can be forgiven, I hope, for being offended by this attitude.

Rule's sentences are sometimes oddly constructed so they need to be read twice to get their sense. It's often a missing comma, or a clause stuffed in the wrong spot. Annoying, but not a deal breaker. When balanced against her insights into human nature, this becomes negligible.

I suppose, as usual, my fundamental complaint about this book is there isn't much to it. Have I become so cranky in my own old age that I can't bear a book that ends with Happily Ever After? I followed the advice of the professors who gave me a quick Jane Rule via facebook thanks Wendy and Douglass! I can say, though, that it is definitely a book written by an experienced writer in firm control of her craft and the narrative at hand.

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May 28, Aryeh rated it really liked it. This is the author that failed to impress me with 'Desert of the Heart', but I'm glad I gave her another shot. You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email.

Notify me of new posts via email. Casey the Canadian Lesbrarian. A Queer Canadian Book Blog: A Glimpse into a Different Kind of Queerness: Topics and activities dear to her heart include cats, bisexuality, libraries, queer Canadian literature, running, and drinking tea. Find her on Twitter: Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. Of the early struggles of glbtaq persons. A powerful love story, involving many people. A reminder of how deep family ties can be.

One of my favorite Jane Rule books. This story gets to the heart of what it means to truly love someone. Jane Rule's Memory Board was recommended to me as the novel I should start with when approaching this Canadian lesbian writing legend who passed away in I followed the advice of the professors who gave me a quick Jane Rule via facebook thanks Wendy and Douglass! I can say, though, that it is definitely a book written by an experienced writer in firm control of her craft and the narrative at hand.

Although it's a novel, Memory Board is also a calculated psychological character study that has more going on in the heads and hearts of the characters than anything conventionally called action. There are a few events, of course, but Rule deals with these developments in such an understated manner that even the revelation that one of the minor characters has AIDS doesn't feel as shocking as it ought to See the rest of my review at my website: One person found this helpful.

I was caught up in this journey between a brother and sister. Having gone through a similar situation it was a inspiration to embrace family, they are really the only true friends. Lesbians and gay men walk in and out of the fabric of Jane Rule's books, just as they do in real life.

Decades ahead of her time she wrote books for people, not minorities, and she will continue to be an unexpected treasure for anyone who discovers her work. These are beautifully written and rewarding books -- Memory Board is perhaps the most unique and powerful -- about life.

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This powerful, sensitive book about a brother and sister separated by an intolerant sister-in-law, and a life-long marriage which has transcended adultery, old age, and memory loss. This book - it's difficult for me to briefly describe how moving it was for me. The story itself touches me because of how deeply I treasure my own relationship with my brothers, and my best friend "sister" -- especially as we all are experiencing the inevitable changes of aging.

It also served to remind me of the creative strategies my brother and I employed to distract my dad from his confused rage in the midst of dementia in his closing years.