How We Live and Why We Die: the secret lives of cells

How We Live and Why We Die: The Secret Lives of Cells
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Return to Book Page. The Secret Lives of Cells 3. Biologist Lewis Wolpert eloquently narrates the basics of human life through the lens of its smallest component—the cell. Everything about our existence—movement and memory, imagination and reproduction, birth and, ultimately, death—is governed by our cells. They are the basis of all life in the universe, from the tiniest bacteria to the most complex animals.

In the tradit Biologist Lewis Wolpert eloquently narrates the basics of human life through the lens of its smallest component—the cell. In the tradition of the classic Lives of a Cell , but with the benefit of the latest research, internationally acclaimed embryologist Lewis Wolpert demonstrates how human life derives from a single cell and then grows into a body, an incredibly complex society made up of billions of them. When we age, our cells cannot repair the damage they have undergone; when we get ill, it is because cells are so damaged they stop working and die.

Wolpert examines the science behind topics that are much discussed but rarely understood—stem cell research, cloning, DNA, mutating cancer cells—and explains how all life evolved from just one cell. Lively and passionate, this is an accessible guide to understanding the human body and life itself.

The Secret Lives of Cells

How We Live and Why We Die has ratings and 33 reviews. Ben said: This book wasn't bad. While generally the scientific basis was solid, certain parts. Buy How We Live and Why We Die: the secret lives of cells Main by Lewis Wolpert (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and.

Hardcover , pages. Published October 19th by W. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Book Review: How We Live and Why We Die: The Secret Lives of Cells by Lewis Wolpert

Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. This book wasn't bad. While generally the scientific basis was solid, certain parts were poorly explained, which makes comprehension rather difficult for any subject matter more complex than the elementary facts. I also tended to get rather infuriated by Wolpert's tendency to go off on a tangent with some seemingly-indignant rant about one topic or another, be it controversy surrounding stem cell research and abortion or the misuse of scientific terms.

I feel such personal and subjective outlook This book wasn't bad. I feel such personal and subjective outlooks do not fit into a non-fiction and supposedly objective biology book. Nevertheless, it is an informative piece which I would recommend to avid scientists.

May 22, Nikki rated it liked it Shelves: Wolpert manages to explain some complex things very cogently: Reviewed for The Bibliophibian. Jul 13, Cloe rated it liked it Shelves: This was a pretty interesting book on cell biology. It's not too short that you don't learn enough, but not too long either that you lose interest. The explanations that Wolpert uses are quite simple and easy to understand, although I would have liked a couple of pictures or diagrams to facilitate understanding.

Luckily, there are not many difficult scientific words in there - if there are, then it's immediately followed by a definition. Before picking up the book, I was afraid that I wouldn't u This was a pretty interesting book on cell biology. Before picking up the book, I was afraid that I wouldn't understand much of it, but luckily, you only need a basic knowledge of biology to be able to read it.

Of course, there were some chapters where I found myself overwhelmed with new information all at once, but what did I expect? Jul 22, Dion Garman rated it really liked it. The Secret Life of Cells is a well written piece of popular science, everything is explained well and as concisely as possible. However, bell biology is extremely complex endeavour and there is only so far your working memory will take you; there are no visuals of any sort in this book that would have helped visualising the more complex machinery of the cell.

However, a quick peruse of the relevant concepts on google would aid the reading of this book a lot. Aug 14, Jessica rated it liked it Shelves: Overall, it seemed like a superficial review of my second semester freshmen biology course. My favorite Chapter 11 was on how bacteria and viruses are dealt with by ourselves.

Everything seems to be explained simply, but some parts did make me lose interest, and there wasn't much of a nice conclusion. Jul 07, Evan rated it it was ok. Felt like it was trying to be the Cell version of Emperor of All Maladies but failed to draw me in. Transitions between chapters and within chapters were very poor. Was hoping for a more exciting version of a cell biology textbook ended up with a cell biology textbook with no pictures and less explanation.

Dec 03, Tiffany rated it liked it Shelves: Wolpert's book isn't bad, but it's not a book that I was particularly in love with. I forced myself to read about 20 pages a day so that I could finish the book.

Additional Information

The book's language is quite easy to understand, given that you have the reading level of a 12th grader. The problem with this book is that it is not compel Wolpert's book isn't bad, but it's not a book that I was particularly in love with. The problem with this book is that it is not compelling or interesting.

While you might think it's difficult to make a book on cells interesting, you'd be correct.

Except for a few tidbits, there's not much in the book that I read that I didn't already learn in my biology courses in college. However, for those that don't have the time or money to sit through hours of lectures, but are interested in knowing some basic things about cells, pick this book up. I don't think that this book would be easy to comprehend to someone who has never taken a science class before, but I'm sure some of the jabs at religious fanatics would be found amusing.

This is not the perfect book to throw at a conservative who doesn't understand climate change or science, it's a book that's a good summary of how cells affect our lives.

How We Live and Why We Die: The Secret Lives of Cells by Lewis Wolpert

Wolpert is not a terrible writer, he's just not a particularly fascinating one. But the book goes b This article is only available to Science News subscribers. Or subscribe today for full access. Get Science News headlines by e-mail. View the discussion thread. Skip to main content. Personal genetics Gravitational waves Eclipse See More.

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How We Live & Why We Die

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