To Lie with Lions: The House of Niccolo 6

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To Lie with Lions. At the end of The Unicorn Hunt, the novel that precedes To Lie with Lions, he wrests his little son Jordan from his estranged wife, Gelis, and sails off into the Venetian night. To Lie with Lions opens several months later, as Nicholas reappears with the boy in Marseilles, draws his wife back to his side, and is soon caught up in the intrigues of the French, Scottish, and Burgundian courts, all vying for the services his money and genius can provide.

He and Gelis, passionately at odds since their wedding night, engage in a no-holds-barred contest for control of their son and of their mutual destiny. Their deadly serious "game" changes the lives of everyone in their orbit and takes Nicholas from Scotland and the frozen volcanic wastes of the north to the easternmost limits of Europe: Cyprus, kingdom of James de Lusignan, friend and foe of his youth.

To Lie with Lions

I must admit that I wasn't too taken with the enigma that was Niccolo when I first started this series but he has become a compelling character. He's a bit "softer" in this book, not so cold and unfeeling. There are some plot twists that I didn't envisage happening and they keep the tension and interest of the series ratched up as a whole.

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Start by marking “To Lie with Lions (The House of Niccolo, #6)” as Want to Read: With the bravura storytelling and pungent authenticity of detail she brought to her acclaimed Lymond Chronicles, Dorothy Dunnett, grande dame of the historical novel, presents The House of. To Lie with Lions: Book Six of The House of Niccolo [Dorothy Dunnett] on linawycatuzy.gq *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. With the bravura storytelling and.

I love the settings, a lot of the action takes place in Iceland. The characters are wonderfully depicted In my eyes this series just gets better and better. The characters are wonderfully depicted and the attention to historical detail is superb.

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A series to be savoured. Aug 28, Joy rated it it was amazing. Nicholas, having engineered a signal success against his wife and her ex-lover, is trying to merge his family into a whole under his own wing. His wife wants nothing to do with ending the war between them.

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In the meantime, he has a business to build, and from Scotland he is reaching out to the valuable fishing of Iceland. This Iceland tour is some of the best adventure writing I have ever read.

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Nicholas has youngsters Robin and Katelijne on his ship, and ahead of him in Iceland are two volcanoes Nicholas, having engineered a signal success against his wife and her ex-lover, is trying to merge his family into a whole under his own wing. Nicholas has youngsters Robin and Katelijne on his ship, and ahead of him in Iceland are two volcanoes building up to blow. The entire section is splendid and nailbiting, with all the dimensions of humanity.

At the same time, he could have managed a peace with his wife except that the vengeful Viscount de Riberac strips bare Nicholas's secrets. As of today, it is my favorite historical novel read of the year.

At the same time, I am outraged that Gelis should judge Nicholas so harshly after all she has done. My favorite adventure read of While the climax lacked the sheer emotional punch of a certain book in the Lymond series, To Lie with Lions 's conclusion is still one calculated to make your jaw drop at the sheer scale of Dunnett's plotting. Nicholas might well be on a course to surpass Lymond in magnificent bastardlyness yes, that's now a word. Gelis and Nicholas' relationship is a startling war of attrition that's as gripping to read about as it is exhausting for them to experience, and I'm very glad that I have Caprice and While the climax lacked the sheer emotional punch of a certain book in the Lymond series, To Lie with Lions 's conclusion is still one calculated to make your jaw drop at the sheer scale of Dunnett's plotting.

Gelis and Nicholas' relationship is a startling war of attrition that's as gripping to read about as it is exhausting for them to experience, and I'm very glad that I have Caprice and Rondo to hand—I really want to see how Dunnett is going to let this cliffhanger play out. Aug 04, Ryan Groesbeck rated it really liked it Shelves: This book was a vast improvement on its predecessor, and I'm not just saying that because it featured my hero Louis XI more prominently: Unicorn Hunt was kind of a meandering travelogue that didn't really seem to accomplish much in terms of advancing the plot or the characterization In any event, the main annoyance o This book was a vast improvement on its predecessor, and I'm not just saying that because it featured my hero Louis XI more prominently: In any event, the main annoyance of this book, to me, is that Nicholas is constantly referring in the text to his Grand Plan, without revealing to the reader what that is.

Now, I have no objection to grand plans -- Game of Kings had one, and its "Aha! But it was under the surface -- here, Nicholas seems to be beating you over the head every few chapters with "Remember that I have a glorious complicated plan! The scenes in Iceland were stellar, with the amazing descriptive power that Dunnett has earned my and many other people's praise for.

Nicholas and Gelis advance their relationship, we understand more of their characters, and the minor ones are nicely fleshed out. In fact, I was all set to give this 5 stars It's nonsensical that Gelis "prove" her cunning worthy of being loved by destroying her husband's business. I mean, I know that much of the series conflict is driven by Nicholas' inability to separate his personal issues from those of his bank, but seriously Dec 02, Katherine rated it really liked it Recommends it for: I don't care for Dunnett's Nicollo series as much as her Lymond series.

Nicholas is rather an oaf given to dangerous games, but at last in this fifth book of the series I keep on reading because Dunnett's use of the English language is thrilling I'm beginning to see his charms.

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Dunnett is treating him more softly. I'm more than half way finished Dec 2, and this I believe is the least violent of Dunnett's Lymond and Nicollo books -- a plus for me. Her plotting leaves some implausibilitie I don't care for Dunnett's Nicollo series as much as her Lymond series. Her plotting leaves some implausibilities, but one tends to forgive Dunnett any faults for her genius with language and description, and her astonishing wit in threading her plots though strange places.

To Lie with Lions: Dorothy Dunnett

We are now in Iceland, having come from Timbuktu in the previous volume: The Unicorn Hunt and some dozen other remote locales as well. Here is 15th century soccer played on the ramparts and roofs of Edinburgh's castle. Not as brilliant as Lymond's rooftop chase in Queen's Play, but then I feel that the first Lymond books: The Game of Kings and Queen's Play, are worth the 5 and 6 readings I've given them so far, and the thought of rereading them yet again feels like the promise of homecoming.

Aug 29, gk rated it did not like it Shelves: I thoroughly disliked the book, which was disappointing, especially considering just how much I loved the first few books in this series.

The feud between Gelis and Niccolo is one of the stupidest I've ever come across, and the reasons behind it on both their sides felt unconvincing and somewhat repugnant. The characterization is also becoming more unbelievable with every book, what with Niccolo being a naturally gifted genius in just about every field, including the supernatural, and Gelis ping I thoroughly disliked the book, which was disappointing, especially considering just how much I loved the first few books in this series.

The characterization is also becoming more unbelievable with every book, what with Niccolo being a naturally gifted genius in just about every field, including the supernatural, and Gelis ping-ponging between brilliance and stupidity as serves the plot -- able to out-guess godly perceptive Niccolo, unable to foresee the direct harm her actions can cause that even a six-year old should be able to figure out. Niccolo would bend over backwards for those he cares for but is brutal with his enemies though rarely to the extent of death , and others pay the price for his revenge.

Why in the world does Dunnett expect me to sympathize with Gelis rather than Niccolo? The moral underpinning of this series seems fatally flawed.

Jul 28, Caro rated it really liked it. Oblique, allusive, the master of showing and not telling, Dunnett is a formidable writer. Only occasionally do I understand the machinations of each character, though I love the action and the characterizations. I did feel the machinery creaking in this one, though, particularly during the adventure in Iceland, filled with erupting volcanoes, walls of fire and marauding bears but serving to advance the plot only a little. The ending is astonishing.

How will Niccolo recover from betraying everyon Oblique, allusive, the master of showing and not telling, Dunnett is a formidable writer. How will Niccolo recover from betraying everyone he cares about? Dec 19, Kate Fortier rated it it was amazing. I own the entire Niccolo series and am currently on the 6th of 8 books, although I have listed all 8 and rated them 5 stars in my profile.

I LOVE this series. The best historical fiction I have ever read. These books transport me, and I love them so much that I am dreading turning the last page I own the entire Niccolo series and am currently on the 6th of 8 books, although I have listed all 8 and rated them 5 stars in my profile. These books transport me, and I love them so much that I am dreading turning the last page of the eighth book. Mar 12, Anne added it Shelves: The Niccolo series and I are taking a break from our relationship. Merchant-banker Nicholas de Fleury, having wrested his infant son from the boy's formidable mother, pauses en route to the land of golden light to set in train a deception that will ensnare nations in the triumphant ruin of his enemies.

This is volume six in the "House of Niccolo". She is best known for her two superb series of historical fiction - The Lymond Chronicles and The House of Niccolo - set in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries and ranging across Europe and the Mediterranean, and for King Hereafter , the eleventh-century story of Earl Thorfinn of Orkney whom Dorothy believed was also King Macbeth. Dunnett died 9 November , having sold half a million copies internationally.